New book: Modern Statistics for Modern Biology

The text book Modern Statistics for Modern Biology by Susan Holmes and Wolfgang Huber has been published through Cambridge University Press (paperback). An online HTML version is also available. From the blurb: “If you are a biologist and want to get the best out of the powerful methods of modern computational statistics, this is your book. You can visualize and analyze your own data, apply unsupervised and supervised learning, integrate datasets, apply hypothesis testing, and make publication-quality figures using the power of R/Bioconductor and ggplot2. This book will teach you ‘cooking from scratch’, from raw data to beautiful illuminating output, as you learn to write your own scripts in the R language and to use advanced statistics packages from CRAN and Bioconductor. It covers a broad range of basic and advanced topics important in the analysis of high-throughput biological data, including principal component analysis and multidimensional scaling, clustering, multiple testing, unsupervised and supervised learning, resampling, the pitfalls of experimental design, and power simulations using Monte Carlo, and it even reaches networks, trees, spatial statistics, image data, and microbial ecology. Using a minimum of mathematical notation, it builds understanding from well-chosen examples, simulation, visualization, and above all hands-on interaction with data and code.”

 

 

Welcome Holly Giles

Holly graduated from the University of Cambridge with a degree in Natural Sciences. For her thesis, she investigated the within-host diversity of influenza infections using statistical methods. In 2016, she undertook an internship at the Francis Crick Institute, London, during which she investigated potential new methods of influenza surveillance and vaccine research.

Holly joined the Huber group in September 2017 for a PhD, where her work focuses on using multi-omic data to understand drug responses in leukaemia patients. She is working jointly with the Dietrich group at the National Centre for Tumour Diseases, Heidelberg, performing experiments and gaining clinical insight to support her bioinformatic analysis.